Pimping Weapons Daily
Factory Cased and Nickel Plated Colt Model 1908 Vest Pocket .25 ACP Pistol

Factory Cased and Nickel Plated Colt Model 1908 Vest Pocket .25 ACP Pistol

peashooter85:

Nice little .25acp Baby Browning with Renaissance engraving.

peashooter85:

Gold plated and cased Beretta Jetfire 950 belonging to Bijan Pakzad a famous designer of menswear and fragrances.
Estimated Value: $1,500 - $2,500

peashooter85:

Gold plated and cased Beretta Jetfire 950 belonging to Bijan Pakzad a famous designer of menswear and fragrances.

Estimated Value: $1,500 - $2,500

peashooter85:

.22 Caliber French Percussion Boxlock pistols.

peashooter85:

.22 Caliber French Percussion Boxlock pistols.

peashooter85:

gunsngear:

The Swamp Angel 
“The years following the American Civil War saw the rise of host of companies that produced small, inexpensive metallic cartridge handguns. Product lines ran from copies of firearms by established manufacturers including Smith & Wesson, to derringers and pepperbox pistols, small spur-trigger and folding-trigger pocket revolvers and “Velo Dog” pistols.Some companies manufactured arms under a variety of different names. Corporate names still familiar today saw their beginnings during this period, including Harrington & Richardson and Iver Johnson. Other companies, such as Forehand & Wadsworth, Hopkins and Allen, Merwin Hulbert & Co., prospered for a time before eventually closing, but most firms appeared on the scene for a brief period before vanishing into obscurity. Such names as “Bang-up,” “Little Giant,” “Swamp Angel,” and “Tramp’s Terror” were some of the many names under which these pistols were marketed by long-forgotten firms.This gold plated “Swamp Angel” is named after a massive 8-inch Parrot cannon that was fired by Union forces on the city of Charleston, South Carolina. This is one of the finer “Swamp Angel” models known.”

Lovely

peashooter85:

gunsngear:

The Swamp Angel 

“The years following the American Civil War saw the rise of host of companies that produced small, inexpensive metallic cartridge handguns. Product lines ran from copies of firearms by established manufacturers including Smith & Wesson, to derringers and pepperbox pistols, small spur-trigger and folding-trigger pocket revolvers and “Velo Dog” pistols.

Some companies manufactured arms under a variety of different names. Corporate names still familiar today saw their beginnings during this period, including Harrington & Richardson and Iver Johnson. Other companies, such as Forehand & Wadsworth, Hopkins and Allen, Merwin Hulbert & Co., prospered for a time before eventually closing, but most firms appeared on the scene for a brief period before vanishing into obscurity. Such names as “Bang-up,” “Little Giant,” “Swamp Angel,” and “Tramp’s Terror” were some of the many names under which these pistols were marketed by long-forgotten firms.

This gold plated “Swamp Angel” is named after a massive 8-inch Parrot cannon that was fired by Union forces on the city of Charleston, South Carolina. This is one of the finer “Swamp Angel” models known.”

Lovely

peashooter85:

North American Arms Mini-Revolvers created by Pueblo artist Ron Yellowhorse.

These are wonderfully hideous.

peashooter85:

Infamous Pocket Pistol—- Liliput Model I .32 automatic.

This little automatic pistol was the possession of Adolf Hitler during World War II. Gold plated, engraved, and with pearl grips, this pistol was presented to Hitler shortly before the start of WWII by party member Max Kehl. The inscription on the slide reads, “Presented to the revered Leader Adolf Hitler by the Party Comrade Kehl in the city of Munich from his home, the City of Weapons, Suhl.”

Throughout his career there were 42 attempts on Hitler’s life. He often carried this gun concealed in a secret pocket sewn into his pants as well as a .32 Walther PPK. In 1945 an as yet anonymous American GI discovered the pistol in a government warehouse in Munich. For almost 30 years he kept the pistol hidden under his bed in Pittsburgh, PA. He then sold the gun to his employer, millionaire cheese manufacturer Ray Bily. Bily stored the pistol in a Nevada bank vault for several more years.

Today the Hitler’s Liliput Pistol is on display at West Point Military Academy.

Value: Priceless